Best Stone Cookware

Nonstick pans are the easy to use, low-maintenance option many of us count on for everyday cooking tasks. But they are also known to greatly lack durability. 

Stone cookware aims to give you the convenience and function of nonstick cookware in a more durable and affordable package.

We’re going to look at some of the best stone cookware options available and whether or not they can fill all of your nonstick needs.

Best Overall: Stone Earth Pan by Ozeri

Stone Earth offers a highly functional nonstick pan with above-average performance and durability. 

Ozeri uses a German-made, stone-derived nonstick coating, but the pan itself is manufactured in China.

The coating is free from PFOS and PFOA, but it is important to note that it does contain PTFE. With proper use and care, there should be no health risk, but the full effects of PTFE are not 100% clear and are still being explored.

The body of the pan is constructed from heavy-gauge aluminum that gives a very solid weight and feel. The aluminum base has also been magnetized so the pan can be used on all cooking surfaces including induction.

The handles are silicone coated and securely riveted to the body of the pan. With an oven-safe rating of 446 F. This high enough for most stove-to-oven cooking tasks.

A handful of owners were not impressed with the nonstick abilities. However, most who followed the pans heating and care guidelines were more than satisfied. 

Always opt for silicon or wood cooking utensils and avoid the use of any metals. You can use a dishwasher in a pinch, but we would recommend handwashing as much as possible to extend the life of the nonstick coating.

There is an 8, 10, and 12-inch option and a tempered glass lid is available as a separate purchase. Ozeri offers a limited lifetime warranty against manufacturer’s defects but not daily wear and tear.

This is a good daily pan with sizes available for most uses, and the durability is better than many of the options in the same price range. The biggest disappointment is that their advertisements make it seem like a 100% chemical-free option. Upon further inspection, we found that there is in fact PTFE in their coating.

Pros

  • Great durability for the price
  • Excellent nonstick properties when a little oil is used
  • Oven safe to 446 F which is high for a nonstick pan
  • Can be used with induction cooktops

Cons

  • Misleading safety claims (not PTFE-free)

Best Budget: Granitestone Nonstick Frying Pan

Granitestone cookware is an As Seen on TV brand. This is not the highest quality option and it’s not one that will give years and years of constant use. It’s our budget pick for a reason, but it can still be a useful option in certain situations.

The pans are pressed from a single piece of aluminum then covered with a nonstick  mineral-enamel coating. The aluminum is quite thin and so these pans are very lightweight. Because they are so thin they will heat very quickly, but can also heat unevenly.

If you’ve seen the infomercials I wouldn’t pay much attention to many of the companies claims. They claim that no additional oil is needed while cooking and that you can crush rocks in it with no negative results.

There are mixed reviews about the nonstick performance of the Granitestone pan. A large portion of these feel duped by the companies claims, but most agree that using a small amount of oil yields decent nonstick results. 

Granitestone cookware is approved oven temperatures all the way up to 500 F. Hot enough for just about any cooking tasks. Even though the pans are also dishwasher safe, handwashing will extend the useful life of the nonstick coating.

Many of the best nonstick pans in this category will only last one or two years. But there are a large number of owners who notice the nonstick properties began to deteriorate in less than a month of regular use.

A limited lifetime warranty covers manufacturer’s defects but will not cover regular use.

Being so affordable is what put Granitestone on this list. This is not a pan that will grow old with you, but for a first time cook, it might fit the bill. If you are just curious about stone cookware, this is also an easy way to test the waters. You can however get significantly better performance from options that are only slightly more expensive.

Pros

  • Very inexpensive
  • Heats up quickly
  • Easy to clean
  • PTFE and PFOA-free

Cons

  • Poor durability
  • Misleading advertisements
  • Cannot be used with induction

Best Upgrade: Stoneline Frying Pan

The Stoneline frying pan is a solid upgrade from the Granitestone and Stone Earth options. Stoneline is close to twice as expensive as our best overall and budget choices but it outperforms both in most areas.

Stoneline uses a German-made, natural stone micro-coating on the frying pan. Even with the thin coating, the nonstick properties of this pan often outlasts the competition. The frying pan is also free from any PFOA, PTFE, cadmium, and lead. Many kitchens would consider this type of coating to be a safer alternative to traditional Teflon pans.

The base of the pan is die-cast aluminum and safe to use on all cooking surfaces including induction. The pan is lightweight but feels very well made and is easy to move around your range. 

The handles are an ergonomic soft-grip Bakelite and are very comfortable to hold. The whole pan is oven safe up to 350 F. That’s hot enough for some applications but you’ll have to avoid any high heat roasting or broiling.

A majority of owners are impressed with the durability of the nonstick cooking surface when properly cared for. That means never using metal utensils and cooking on medium heat.

The pan is rated to be dishwasher safe, but hand washing as much as possible will further extend the life of the nonstick coating.

At about 9.5” the Stoneline frying pan is on the small side compared to our other choices,  but is still a good everyday pan for one or two people. They also have an 11” version as well as an eight-piece set with the most useful sized pots and pans along with glass lids.

If you notice any unusual wear and tear, the company does stand behind its 12-year warranty against manufacturer’s defects or faulty materials.

If you’re already a fan of stone cookware then the higher cost of Stoneline might still be worth the splurge.

Pros

  • Nonstick surface tends to last longer than many competitors 
  • Works with any cooktop including induction
  • Very easy to clean by hand
  • PTFE and PFOA-free

Cons

  • Priced at the high end for this category
  • Oven-safe temperature of 350 F is on the low side

Is stone cookware any good?

Performance varies from brand to brand, and there can be alot of marketing schemes to sift through.

Many manufacturers make low quality products that will quickly need to be replaced. But, the ones doing it well, utilize stone substances to add much needed durability to the nonstick category. If you can find the ones doing that, stone cookware can be an excellent and often affordable option.

Even with the added durability, It’s important to follow any included care instructions. That generally means always avoiding the use of metal utensils, and minimizing dishwasher use as much as possible.

What is the best stone cookware?

The Stone Earth frying pan by Ozeri offers the best all-around performance at a very reasonable price. 

It’s a good idea to think about the things you cook most often and match that to the cookware you purchase. For instance, if you cook a lot of large cuts of meat, it might be important that your pan be oven safe to over 400 F.

When choosing stone cookware, look for options that have a nonstick surface that is durable and actually performs as it is advertised. Many brands make outlandish claims and wild demonstrations. It’s best to take all of that information with a grain of salt and look to real owners’ experiences.

Is stone cookware safe?

The use of “stone” substances are generally added to nonstick cookware to add strength and heat conductivity. Even though stone cookware is often sold as a health-oriented nonstick alternative there is no rule that they cannot contain PTFE or other chemical compounds.

If toxin-free cookware is particularly important to you, it is always a good idea to read any fine print or even contact the manufacturer. Many brands will point out that they are PFOA free but still use PTFE in their nonstick coatings.  

Ceramic vs. Stone: Which is better?

Many companies selling ceramic-nonstick cookware enlist the help of an additional material to make their products stand out, and stone/granite is one of those. So ceramic and stone are often one and the same.

Some of the other common materials used are: copper, titanium, or diamond. The use of those materials, including stone, are generally intended to promote durability and heat conductivity.

How much of each special ingredient is used and what effect it has on performance is a case by case basis. The common consensus though, is that these materials are used mainly for marketing purposes and the added performance is incremental.

It’s easy to find both cheap and expensive options in this category. However, If you look at cookware in similar price ranges, the options using stone tend to be a bit more durable.

Is stone cookware suitable for induction cooking?

Stone cookware is not inherently compatible with induction cooking. The “stone” component of a pot or pan is found in the nonstick coating, whereas induction compatibility depends primarily on the materials used during construction of a pan’s base.

It seems that more and more brands are making induction compatible nonstick cookware. This is done by magnetizing the base of the cookware or inserting a steel or iron core in order to make them usable with induction ranges.

If you have an induction cooktop be sure to carefully check any options you are considering as it changes from brand to brand.

Is stone cookware good for a glass top stove?

All stone cookware should work with glass top stoves. Most brands feature an aluminum-based pot or pan which gives great conductivity. An important factor with glass stovetops.

Look out for the cheaper options that may be made from very thin stamped aluminum. They will still work but are often very lightweight and can have poor surface contact or be susceptible to warping.

Our Recommendation

Stone cookware is an increasingly popular nonstick option. It can offer good utility and durability in an affordable package. 

Our top pick, Stone Earth boasts an excellent and lasting nonstick pan at a very accessible price. The use of PTFE in their coating is disappointing but may also contribute to the excellent nonstick properties. If that is a deal-breaker, the Stoneline pan is worth the slightly higher price tag for a safer alternative with outstanding performance.

If you want something to take camping, use in a rental property, or to get general cooking practice with, the Granitestone is a low-stakes alternative.

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